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I WOULD LiCK TO BE SOMEONE ELSE

excerpt from video work, 2021

[[ By entering this screen, you will experience a sound. You are about to discover a sound which undermines the automatic connection between silence and voice, often perceived as obvious. ]]] This part of the exhibition echoes the meeting between Dante and his friend Cassella at the Purgatory. In the meeting, Casella sings one of Dante’s poems to which he composed a melody. However, the listeners of this composed poem, Dante included, are later being reproached as they are yet to be fully purified, and therefore, their current spiritual state is seen as non deserving of this poem.

The video work I WOULD LiCK TO BE SOMEONE ELSE is a slow and quiet movement, which tells the story of an undeciphered character. Similar to the soul's long journey within the purgatorium, as in a cinematic show, fragments of bodies move in front of the viewer, as the character flickers and disappears in different and strange configurations. The images revealed on the screen range from familiar to strange, from shabby to luxurious. Similarly, just by listening to the audio part itself, the audience finds themselves in a limbo, ranging from an experience of alienation and detachment to a sense of familiarity and belonging. The slow, yet threatening and intense movement produces in the viewer a pendulum motion between staring and floating and examination and inquiry. Moreover, the Purge Pray Play exhibition asks to reinvent the relationship between what is being seen and what is being heard in the virtual realm. We suggest a new approach to the video work by first exposing the viewers solely to the audio part, and later on to the visual part as well by accessing [TheWrongTV/link] streaming page.

About Yuwol June C. [https://sites.google.com/view/k-otj] Yuwol June C. is a multidisciplinary artist, who uses a variety of mediums such as: performance, painting, video, installations, digital art and prints. The artist's works often counter the themes within the obscured borders of technology and humanity; and interrogating how new political, theoretical and social structures form and thrive in these new portals of being. The physical presence of the body, is a recurring motif in the artist’s body of works, emphasizing the allegorical contexts that accompany the existence of the body. The body appears in different personas and narratives, contrasting, intersecting, from Western and Eastern culture, female and male, breaks accepted dichotomies and offers in their place allegorical contexts that summon multiple meanings. Xéna N.C. Xéna N.C. is a queer Performer, Artivist, Rapper & Producer currently based in Vienna. She is the founder of the independent art collective JXL Productions where she is also the Video Director & Editor for several projects.

x

About Purge, Pray, Play

[ i ] - read about the exhibition
[ venus ] - read about the artist + artwork at this level
[ harp ] - experience the piece by Yuwol June C
[ locks ] each level opens a new lock. You can move and jump between open levels through the open locks.
[ purge, pray, play ] go back to the mountain. You can move between open levels through the mountain’s lit terraces
[ interact ] use your fingers to play/pause a video, zoom into a 3d model, scroll through a 3d image

[PADMENIC > LOOKING AT DANTE]

We are living in an era when the global collective is trying to resurrect itself from the wounds of a pandemic, unsure whether heaven will ever be back, or, perhaps, the hell of trying to tame an invisible virus is here to stay. Looking for some wisdom, we looked back to a classic - Dante Alleghieri’s seventh-levelled Purgatorio, the space between heaven and hell, the liminal crossing between paying for one’s sins and enjoying heaven’s delights. Although the notion of a purgatory, a transformative place for purging one’s sins, is very Christian in nature, similiar concepts exist within other traditions, too: Al A’raf in Islam, the Narakas in Buddhism, and the Barrelhaven in Judaism. The notion of climbing seven levels is also prevalent in ancient myths, like Inanna in the Underworld.

[PURGING > AS A RITUAL]

Traditionally, humans turned to different purging acts in order to cope with unknown viruses devouring their lives, literally and metaphorically. Humanity’s attempt at purifying itself from the virus’ threat isn’t completely rational, though we can find some reasoning for it. The purging act serves as a ritual act as well, playful at times, which taps into our age-old psyche and grants us some peace of mind. What is associated today with using hand sanitizing gel, or wearing a surgical mask, has been taking place centuries ago with the act of fumigation and other purging acts. We detect the playfulness in contemporary rituals and we intend to merge the experience of an art exhibition with a unique user experience giving a chance to actively engage, explore and build onto existing works as creative collaboration. The Purgatorio’s viewer will be the spect-actor, one who will activate the experience while submitting to the set logic of the purgatory, which demands their attention at viewing each level and its artworks to unlock the next level and so forth.

[ARTISTIC PRACTICE > VAPORWAVE AND MIDDLE AGES]

The Purgatorio Mountain, visually rendered by Ronnie Karfiol, is standing lonely inside the digital-landscape, taking its inspiration from the vaporwave aesthetic, reminiscent of the computer commercials of the 1980s and 1990s. Much like in medieval art, the mountain is disconnected from a realistic perspective, not actually trying to portray anything other than ideas and concepts. Taken together, the combination of these two inspirational sources represent what philosopher Žarko Paić called “the image without the world”, image artifacts that pop up in the landscape and no longer have a reference in time or space; nor do they have nature or history. They depict the haunting freedom of representation in terms of the artificiality of the virtual world.

[ARTWORKS AND THE SPECT-ACTOR TOUR]

The artworks themselves also function as images without a world. Entering the Purgatorio Mountain, we first see Léa Porré’s Royal Fate is Fluid, which follows Louis XVI's decapitated head, confronting us with the notion of Pride. On the second level, Yiming Yang’s 3D model Splice is a hybrid - a meeting between a spider and a human being, reflecting on whether the boundaries between technology and the body could trigger in us a feeling of Envy. Following this is another Cyborgian example by artist Anthr0morph, which investigates the non-human bodies in their performance on Instagram, perhaps evoking sentiments of Wrath. The fourth floor of Sloth lets us meet Yun Choi’s Where The Heart Goes, an exploration of the sense of banality in the collective faith behind common images.

Ballet Pathetique by Adam Basanta is on the fifth terrace, showing us the useless act of Greed as expressed in the orchestrated dance of simple oscillating fans. The sixth floor, that of Gluttony, is where Letta Shtohryn’s video Offshore Bakery, shows an investigative look into the financial meganetworks woven behind the romantic facade of Valletta's old town buildings. Getting to the top, we reach the seventh level of Lust, where Mor Afgin’s installation UXUI juxtaposes the life cycle of a biological bird with that of a Bird public scooter. Throughout the journey up the floors, a sound plays in the background. Taken from Yuwol June C's video-work I would lick to be someone else. The audio (created together with rapper Xéna N.C.) is separated from its visual source, evokes the vague feeling of being trapped inside an unknown quest.

At last, we arrive at the floor of Heavenly Paradise: this is where Ebstorfer World Map by Liliana Farber invites us to take a closer look at the crossing between the reality of Google Maps and that of world travelers from centuries ago. At this moment, the game changes. We perceive the Purgatorio Mountain from another perspective, as a moment of the Kantian sublime, as the image stretches on the screen beyond all previous limitations of the quest level design. After breaking the game’s grid, inciting a visceral meaning-making, the linear exhibition mode collapses, too: the viewer has to decide whether they want to get out of the maze, or go back to the Mountain and its artworks.

About Lital Bar-Noy

Lital Bar Noy is a user experience designer and a curator. She holds a B.Des from Shenkar Visual Communication and a M.A from Bezalel, Policy and Theory of the Arts. She was an exchange student in the Department of Critical Studies at the Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna, Austria. Received an academic merit award in 2018-2019. Bar Noy participated in Facebook’s international internship program and for the past two years has been working as a product designer at Microsoft.

About Ronnie Karfiol

Ronnie Karfiol is an artist. She holds a BFA in Arts from Shenkar college, Tel Aviv. She has also studied at the H.A.W. University Hamburg, Germany. Her work was shown in museums such as Petach Tikva Museum of Art & Nahum Guttman museum [IL] as well as in galleries like SPEKTRUM Berlin, Galleria R+ Poland & the Center of Contemporary Art (CCA) Tel Aviv. Her films screened at festivals, including DocAviv, Print Screen, EMAF Germany and Currents Festival, USA. She is the recipient of Margaret & Sylvan Adams Prize (2017), the Mifal HaPais Council for Arts (2018) and the Ministry of Culture Independent Artists’ grant (2019) and the Rabinovich Foundation (2020). In 2020 She was a web resident at the joint initiative between ZKM Museum and Akademie Solitude [DE]. In 2018, she was an artist-in-residence at Cripta747 [IT]. Her works are part of the collections in both the Guttman Museum [IL] and the Herzliya Museum of Contemporary Art [IL].

x

I WOULD LiCK TO BE SOMEONE ELSE

excerpt from video work, 2021

[[ By entering this screen, you will experience a sound. You are about to discover a sound which undermines the automatic connection between silence and voice, often perceived as obvious. ]]] This part of the exhibition echoes the meeting between Dante and his friend Cassella at the Purgatory. In the meeting, Casella sings one of Dante’s poems to which he composed a melody. However, the listeners of this composed poem, Dante included, are later being reproached as they are yet to be fully purified, and therefore, their current spiritual state is seen as non deserving of this poem.

The video work I WOULD LiCK TO BE SOMEONE ELSE is a slow and quiet movement, which tells the story of an undeciphered character. Similar to the soul's long journey within the purgatorium, as in a cinematic show, fragments of bodies move in front of the viewer, as the character flickers and disappears in different and strange configurations. The images revealed on the screen range from familiar to strange, from shabby to luxurious. Similarly, just by listening to the audio part itself, the audience finds themselves in a limbo, ranging from an experience of alienation and detachment to a sense of familiarity and belonging. The slow, yet threatening and intense movement produces in the viewer a pendulum motion between staring and floating and examination and inquiry. Moreover, the Purge Pray Play exhibition asks to reinvent the relationship between what is being seen and what is being heard in the virtual realm. We suggest a new approach to the video work by first exposing the viewers solely to the audio part, and later on to the visual part as well by accessing [TheWrongTV/link] streaming page.

About Yuwol June C. [https://sites.google.com/view/k-otj] Yuwol June C. is a multidisciplinary artist, who uses a variety of mediums such as: performance, painting, video, installations, digital art and prints. The artist's works often counter the themes within the obscured borders of technology and humanity; and interrogating how new political, theoretical and social structures form and thrive in these new portals of being. The physical presence of the body, is a recurring motif in the artist’s body of works, emphasizing the allegorical contexts that accompany the existence of the body. The body appears in different personas and narratives, contrasting, intersecting, from Western and Eastern culture, female and male, breaks accepted dichotomies and offers in their place allegorical contexts that summon multiple meanings. Xéna N.C. Xéna N.C. is a queer Performer, Artivist, Rapper & Producer currently based in Vienna. She is the founder of the independent art collective JXL Productions where she is also the Video Director & Editor for several projects.

x

About Purge, Pray, Play

[ i ] - read about the exhibition
[ venus ] - read about the artist + artwork at this level
[ harp ] - experience the piece by Yuwol June C
[ locks ] each level opens a new lock. You can move and jump between open levels through the open locks.
[ purge, pray, play ] go back to the mountain. You can move between open levels through the mountain’s lit terraces
[ interact ] use your fingers to play/pause a video, zoom into a 3d model, scroll through a 3d image

[PADMENIC > LOOKING AT DANTE]

We are living in an era when the global collective is trying to resurrect itself from the wounds of a pandemic, unsure whether heaven will ever be back, or, perhaps, the hell of trying to tame an invisible virus is here to stay. Looking for some wisdom, we looked back to a classic - Dante Alleghieri’s seventh-levelled Purgatorio, the space between heaven and hell, the liminal crossing between paying for one’s sins and enjoying heaven’s delights. Although the notion of a purgatory, a transformative place for purging one’s sins, is very Christian in nature, similiar concepts exist within other traditions, too: Al A’raf in Islam, the Narakas in Buddhism, and the Barrelhaven in Judaism. The notion of climbing seven levels is also prevalent in ancient myths, like Inanna in the Underworld.

[PURGING > AS A RITUAL]

Traditionally, humans turned to different purging acts in order to cope with unknown viruses devouring their lives, literally and metaphorically. Humanity’s attempt at purifying itself from the virus’ threat isn’t completely rational, though we can find some reasoning for it. The purging act serves as a ritual act as well, playful at times, which taps into our age-old psyche and grants us some peace of mind. What is associated today with using hand sanitizing gel, or wearing a surgical mask, has been taking place centuries ago with the act of fumigation and other purging acts. We detect the playfulness in contemporary rituals and we intend to merge the experience of an art exhibition with a unique user experience giving a chance to actively engage, explore and build onto existing works as creative collaboration. The Purgatorio’s viewer will be the spect-actor, one who will activate the experience while submitting to the set logic of the purgatory, which demands their attention at viewing each level and its artworks to unlock the next level and so forth.

[ARTISTIC PRACTICE > VAPORWAVE AND MIDDLE AGES]

The Purgatorio Mountain, visually rendered by Ronnie Karfiol, is standing lonely inside the digital-landscape, taking its inspiration from the vaporwave aesthetic, reminiscent of the computer commercials of the 1980s and 1990s. Much like in medieval art, the mountain is disconnected from a realistic perspective, not actually trying to portray anything other than ideas and concepts. Taken together, the combination of these two inspirational sources represent what philosopher Žarko Paić called “the image without the world”, image artifacts that pop up in the landscape and no longer have a reference in time or space; nor do they have nature or history. They depict the haunting freedom of representation in terms of the artificiality of the virtual world.

[ARTWORKS AND THE SPECT-ACTOR TOUR]

The artworks themselves also function as images without a world. Entering the Purgatorio Mountain, we first see Léa Porré’s Royal Fate is Fluid, which follows Louis XVI's decapitated head, confronting us with the notion of Pride. On the second level, Yiming Yang’s 3D model Splice is a hybrid - a meeting between a spider and a human being, reflecting on whether the boundaries between technology and the body could trigger in us a feeling of Envy. Following this is another Cyborgian example by artist Anthr0morph, which investigates the non-human bodies in their performance on Instagram, perhaps evoking sentiments of Wrath. The fourth floor of Sloth lets us meet Yun Choi’s Where The Heart Goes, an exploration of the sense of banality in the collective faith behind common images.

Ballet Pathetique by Adam Basanta is on the fifth terrace, showing us the useless act of Greed as expressed in the orchestrated dance of simple oscillating fans. The sixth floor, that of Gluttony, is where Letta Shtohryn’s video Offshore Bakery, shows an investigative look into the financial meganetworks woven behind the romantic facade of Valletta's old town buildings. Getting to the top, we reach the seventh level of Lust, where Mor Afgin’s installation UXUI juxtaposes the life cycle of a biological bird with that of a Bird public scooter. Throughout the journey up the floors, a sound plays in the background. Taken from Yuwol June C's video-work I would lick to be someone else. The audio (created together with rapper Xéna N.C.) is separated from its visual source, evokes the vague feeling of being trapped inside an unknown quest.

At last, we arrive at the floor of Heavenly Paradise: this is where Ebstorfer World Map by Liliana Farber invites us to take a closer look at the crossing between the reality of Google Maps and that of world travelers from centuries ago. At this moment, the game changes. We perceive the Purgatorio Mountain from another perspective, as a moment of the Kantian sublime, as the image stretches on the screen beyond all previous limitations of the quest level design. After breaking the game’s grid, inciting a visceral meaning-making, the linear exhibition mode collapses, too: the viewer has to decide whether they want to get out of the maze, or go back to the Mountain and its artworks.

About Lital Bar-Noy

Lital Bar Noy is a user experience designer and a curator. She holds a B.Des from Shenkar Visual Communication and a M.A from Bezalel, Policy and Theory of the Arts. She was an exchange student in the Department of Critical Studies at the Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna, Austria. Received an academic merit award in 2018-2019. Bar Noy participated in Facebook’s international internship program and for the past two years has been working as a product designer at Microsoft.

About Ronnie Karfiol

Ronnie Karfiol is an artist. She holds a BFA in Arts from Shenkar college, Tel Aviv. She has also studied at the H.A.W. University Hamburg, Germany. Her work was shown in museums such as Petach Tikva Museum of Art & Nahum Guttman museum [IL] as well as in galleries like SPEKTRUM Berlin, Galleria R+ Poland & the Center of Contemporary Art (CCA) Tel Aviv. Her films screened at festivals, including DocAviv, Print Screen, EMAF Germany and Currents Festival, USA. She is the recipient of Margaret & Sylvan Adams Prize (2017), the Mifal HaPais Council for Arts (2018) and the Ministry of Culture Independent Artists’ grant (2019) and the Rabinovich Foundation (2020). In 2020 She was a web resident at the joint initiative between ZKM Museum and Akademie Solitude [DE]. In 2018, she was an artist-in-residence at Cripta747 [IT]. Her works are part of the collections in both the Guttman Museum [IL] and the Herzliya Museum of Contemporary Art [IL].

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Royal Fate is Fluid

HD Video, Sound 08:13 min, 2020.

In Royal Fate is Fluid Artist Léa Porré re-visits the myth of king Louis XVI. This is an initiatory journey of Louis XVI's head, after its infamous decapitation in 1793. As one follows Louis XVI's head across his quest to regeneration, a unique turn of events unfolds, breathing new air into an age-old story. What could be considered a passe historical event symbolizing the long-gone French royalty and their mishaps, suddenly evokes a contemporary geist of pride and economical instability.

About Léa Porré

Léa Porré is a French and Belgian artist born in 1996, who graduated from the Royal College of Art (MA Contemporary Art Practice) in 2021, and from Central Saint Martins (BAFA 4D) in 2018. Porré composes speculative transhistorical narratives that disrupt national iconography, rituals and beliefs. Recently, her practice has employed speculative fiction as a methodology for imagining the return of the French monarchy, with the resurgent King positioned as a wellness guru, sacrificial vessel, and alchemical master.

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Unlock next floor >

I WOULD LiCK TO BE SOMEONE ELSE

excerpt from video work, 2021

[[ By entering this screen, you will experience a sound. You are about to discover a sound which undermines the automatic connection between silence and voice, often perceived as obvious. ]]] This part of the exhibition echoes the meeting between Dante and his friend Cassella at the Purgatory. In the meeting, Casella sings one of Dante’s poems to which he composed a melody. However, the listeners of this composed poem, Dante included, are later being reproached as they are yet to be fully purified, and therefore, their current spiritual state is seen as non deserving of this poem.

The video work I WOULD LiCK TO BE SOMEONE ELSE is a slow and quiet movement, which tells the story of an undeciphered character. Similar to the soul's long journey within the purgatorium, as in a cinematic show, fragments of bodies move in front of the viewer, as the character flickers and disappears in different and strange configurations. The images revealed on the screen range from familiar to strange, from shabby to luxurious. Similarly, just by listening to the audio part itself, the audience finds themselves in a limbo, ranging from an experience of alienation and detachment to a sense of familiarity and belonging. The slow, yet threatening and intense movement produces in the viewer a pendulum motion between staring and floating and examination and inquiry. Moreover, the Purge Pray Play exhibition asks to reinvent the relationship between what is being seen and what is being heard in the virtual realm. We suggest a new approach to the video work by first exposing the viewers solely to the audio part, and later on to the visual part as well by accessing [TheWrongTV/link] streaming page.

About Yuwol June C. [https://sites.google.com/view/k-otj] Yuwol June C. is a multidisciplinary artist, who uses a variety of mediums such as: performance, painting, video, installations, digital art and prints. The artist's works often counter the themes within the obscured borders of technology and humanity; and interrogating how new political, theoretical and social structures form and thrive in these new portals of being. The physical presence of the body, is a recurring motif in the artist’s body of works, emphasizing the allegorical contexts that accompany the existence of the body. The body appears in different personas and narratives, contrasting, intersecting, from Western and Eastern culture, female and male, breaks accepted dichotomies and offers in their place allegorical contexts that summon multiple meanings. Xéna N.C. Xéna N.C. is a queer Performer, Artivist, Rapper & Producer currently based in Vienna. She is the founder of the independent art collective JXL Productions where she is also the Video Director & Editor for several projects.

x

About Purge, Pray, Play

[ i ] - read about the exhibition
[ venus ] - read about the artist + artwork at this level
[ harp ] - experience the piece by Yuwol June C
[ locks ] each level opens a new lock. You can move and jump between open levels through the open locks.
[ purge, pray, play ] go back to the mountain. You can move between open levels through the mountain’s lit terraces
[ interact ] use your fingers to play/pause a video, zoom into a 3d model, scroll through a 3d image

[PADMENIC > LOOKING AT DANTE]

We are living in an era when the global collective is trying to resurrect itself from the wounds of a pandemic, unsure whether heaven will ever be back, or, perhaps, the hell of trying to tame an invisible virus is here to stay. Looking for some wisdom, we looked back to a classic - Dante Alleghieri’s seventh-levelled Purgatorio, the space between heaven and hell, the liminal crossing between paying for one’s sins and enjoying heaven’s delights. Although the notion of a purgatory, a transformative place for purging one’s sins, is very Christian in nature, similiar concepts exist within other traditions, too: Al A’raf in Islam, the Narakas in Buddhism, and the Barrelhaven in Judaism. The notion of climbing seven levels is also prevalent in ancient myths, like Inanna in the Underworld.

[PURGING > AS A RITUAL]

Traditionally, humans turned to different purging acts in order to cope with unknown viruses devouring their lives, literally and metaphorically. Humanity’s attempt at purifying itself from the virus’ threat isn’t completely rational, though we can find some reasoning for it. The purging act serves as a ritual act as well, playful at times, which taps into our age-old psyche and grants us some peace of mind. What is associated today with using hand sanitizing gel, or wearing a surgical mask, has been taking place centuries ago with the act of fumigation and other purging acts. We detect the playfulness in contemporary rituals and we intend to merge the experience of an art exhibition with a unique user experience giving a chance to actively engage, explore and build onto existing works as creative collaboration. The Purgatorio’s viewer will be the spect-actor, one who will activate the experience while submitting to the set logic of the purgatory, which demands their attention at viewing each level and its artworks to unlock the next level and so forth.

[ARTISTIC PRACTICE > VAPORWAVE AND MIDDLE AGES]

The Purgatorio Mountain, visually rendered by Ronnie Karfiol, is standing lonely inside the digital-landscape, taking its inspiration from the vaporwave aesthetic, reminiscent of the computer commercials of the 1980s and 1990s. Much like in medieval art, the mountain is disconnected from a realistic perspective, not actually trying to portray anything other than ideas and concepts. Taken together, the combination of these two inspirational sources represent what philosopher Žarko Paić called “the image without the world”, image artifacts that pop up in the landscape and no longer have a reference in time or space; nor do they have nature or history. They depict the haunting freedom of representation in terms of the artificiality of the virtual world.

[ARTWORKS AND THE SPECT-ACTOR TOUR]

The artworks themselves also function as images without a world. Entering the Purgatorio Mountain, we first see Léa Porré’s Royal Fate is Fluid, which follows Louis XVI's decapitated head, confronting us with the notion of Pride. On the second level, Yiming Yang’s 3D model Splice is a hybrid - a meeting between a spider and a human being, reflecting on whether the boundaries between technology and the body could trigger in us a feeling of Envy. Following this is another Cyborgian example by artist Anthr0morph, which investigates the non-human bodies in their performance on Instagram, perhaps evoking sentiments of Wrath. The fourth floor of Sloth lets us meet Yun Choi’s Where The Heart Goes, an exploration of the sense of banality in the collective faith behind common images.

Ballet Pathetique by Adam Basanta is on the fifth terrace, showing us the useless act of Greed as expressed in the orchestrated dance of simple oscillating fans. The sixth floor, that of Gluttony, is where Letta Shtohryn’s video Offshore Bakery, shows an investigative look into the financial meganetworks woven behind the romantic facade of Valletta's old town buildings. Getting to the top, we reach the seventh level of Lust, where Mor Afgin’s installation UXUI juxtaposes the life cycle of a biological bird with that of a Bird public scooter. Throughout the journey up the floors, a sound plays in the background. Taken from Yuwol June C's video-work I would lick to be someone else. The audio (created together with rapper Xéna N.C.) is separated from its visual source, evokes the vague feeling of being trapped inside an unknown quest.

At last, we arrive at the floor of Heavenly Paradise: this is where Ebstorfer World Map by Liliana Farber invites us to take a closer look at the crossing between the reality of Google Maps and that of world travelers from centuries ago. At this moment, the game changes. We perceive the Purgatorio Mountain from another perspective, as a moment of the Kantian sublime, as the image stretches on the screen beyond all previous limitations of the quest level design. After breaking the game’s grid, inciting a visceral meaning-making, the linear exhibition mode collapses, too: the viewer has to decide whether they want to get out of the maze, or go back to the Mountain and its artworks.

About Lital Bar-Noy

Lital Bar Noy is a user experience designer and a curator. She holds a B.Des from Shenkar Visual Communication and a M.A from Bezalel, Policy and Theory of the Arts. She was an exchange student in the Department of Critical Studies at the Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna, Austria. Received an academic merit award in 2018-2019. Bar Noy participated in Facebook’s international internship program and for the past two years has been working as a product designer at Microsoft.

About Ronnie Karfiol

Ronnie Karfiol is an artist. She holds a BFA in Arts from Shenkar college, Tel Aviv. She has also studied at the H.A.W. University Hamburg, Germany. Her work was shown in museums such as Petach Tikva Museum of Art & Nahum Guttman museum [IL] as well as in galleries like SPEKTRUM Berlin, Galleria R+ Poland & the Center of Contemporary Art (CCA) Tel Aviv. Her films screened at festivals, including DocAviv, Print Screen, EMAF Germany and Currents Festival, USA. She is the recipient of Margaret & Sylvan Adams Prize (2017), the Mifal HaPais Council for Arts (2018) and the Ministry of Culture Independent Artists’ grant (2019) and the Rabinovich Foundation (2020). In 2020 She was a web resident at the joint initiative between ZKM Museum and Akademie Solitude [DE]. In 2018, she was an artist-in-residence at Cripta747 [IT]. Her works are part of the collections in both the Guttman Museum [IL] and the Herzliya Museum of Contemporary Art [IL].

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Splice

Digital 3D Model, 2020

The premise of the study for Splice is that spiders detect sound with their legs. Added to this is the speculative enquiry as to what would occur when human sensory systems are built and improved on by deploying various contemporary technologies. Taking inspiration from Haraway’s “Cyborg Manifesto” and the contemporary popularity of post-human cultural theory, Splice serves as a reflection of the conflict and coupling between the human cognitive body and the technological body. It also ponders on whether technology will affect the human perception of the body as a whole.

About Yiming Yang

Yiming Yang is an installation artist. She graduated from the Royal College of Art in 2020 with an MA in Information Experience Design. She attended the Swatch Art Peace Hotel as Artist-in-Residence. Her works were featured in Apple Store Regent Street, London, UK and Ircam Centre Pompidou, Paris, France. She has also presented her work in Tate Modern, Microsoft and Power Station of Art. Yiming’s work pushes forward the horizons of today’s post Anthropocene visions, where utopia and dystopia clash in uncertainty.

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I WOULD LiCK TO BE SOMEONE ELSE

excerpt from video work, 2021

[[ By entering this screen, you will experience a sound. You are about to discover a sound which undermines the automatic connection between silence and voice, often perceived as obvious. ]]] This part of the exhibition echoes the meeting between Dante and his friend Cassella at the Purgatory. In the meeting, Casella sings one of Dante’s poems to which he composed a melody. However, the listeners of this composed poem, Dante included, are later being reproached as they are yet to be fully purified, and therefore, their current spiritual state is seen as non deserving of this poem.

The video work I WOULD LiCK TO BE SOMEONE ELSE is a slow and quiet movement, which tells the story of an undeciphered character. Similar to the soul's long journey within the purgatorium, as in a cinematic show, fragments of bodies move in front of the viewer, as the character flickers and disappears in different and strange configurations. The images revealed on the screen range from familiar to strange, from shabby to luxurious. Similarly, just by listening to the audio part itself, the audience finds themselves in a limbo, ranging from an experience of alienation and detachment to a sense of familiarity and belonging. The slow, yet threatening and intense movement produces in the viewer a pendulum motion between staring and floating and examination and inquiry. Moreover, the Purge Pray Play exhibition asks to reinvent the relationship between what is being seen and what is being heard in the virtual realm. We suggest a new approach to the video work by first exposing the viewers solely to the audio part, and later on to the visual part as well by accessing [TheWrongTV/link] streaming page.

About Yuwol June C. [https://sites.google.com/view/k-otj] Yuwol June C. is a multidisciplinary artist, who uses a variety of mediums such as: performance, painting, video, installations, digital art and prints. The artist's works often counter the themes within the obscured borders of technology and humanity; and interrogating how new political, theoretical and social structures form and thrive in these new portals of being. The physical presence of the body, is a recurring motif in the artist’s body of works, emphasizing the allegorical contexts that accompany the existence of the body. The body appears in different personas and narratives, contrasting, intersecting, from Western and Eastern culture, female and male, breaks accepted dichotomies and offers in their place allegorical contexts that summon multiple meanings. Xéna N.C. Xéna N.C. is a queer Performer, Artivist, Rapper & Producer currently based in Vienna. She is the founder of the independent art collective JXL Productions where she is also the Video Director & Editor for several projects.

x

About Purge, Pray, Play

[ i ] - read about the exhibition
[ venus ] - read about the artist + artwork at this level
[ harp ] - experience the piece by Yuwol June C
[ locks ] each level opens a new lock. You can move and jump between open levels through the open locks.
[ purge, pray, play ] go back to the mountain. You can move between open levels through the mountain’s lit terraces
[ interact ] use your fingers to play/pause a video, zoom into a 3d model, scroll through a 3d image

[PADMENIC > LOOKING AT DANTE]

We are living in an era when the global collective is trying to resurrect itself from the wounds of a pandemic, unsure whether heaven will ever be back, or, perhaps, the hell of trying to tame an invisible virus is here to stay. Looking for some wisdom, we looked back to a classic - Dante Alleghieri’s seventh-levelled Purgatorio, the space between heaven and hell, the liminal crossing between paying for one’s sins and enjoying heaven’s delights. Although the notion of a purgatory, a transformative place for purging one’s sins, is very Christian in nature, similiar concepts exist within other traditions, too: Al A’raf in Islam, the Narakas in Buddhism, and the Barrelhaven in Judaism. The notion of climbing seven levels is also prevalent in ancient myths, like Inanna in the Underworld.

[PURGING > AS A RITUAL]

Traditionally, humans turned to different purging acts in order to cope with unknown viruses devouring their lives, literally and metaphorically. Humanity’s attempt at purifying itself from the virus’ threat isn’t completely rational, though we can find some reasoning for it. The purging act serves as a ritual act as well, playful at times, which taps into our age-old psyche and grants us some peace of mind. What is associated today with using hand sanitizing gel, or wearing a surgical mask, has been taking place centuries ago with the act of fumigation and other purging acts. We detect the playfulness in contemporary rituals and we intend to merge the experience of an art exhibition with a unique user experience giving a chance to actively engage, explore and build onto existing works as creative collaboration. The Purgatorio’s viewer will be the spect-actor, one who will activate the experience while submitting to the set logic of the purgatory, which demands their attention at viewing each level and its artworks to unlock the next level and so forth.

[ARTISTIC PRACTICE > VAPORWAVE AND MIDDLE AGES]

The Purgatorio Mountain, visually rendered by Ronnie Karfiol, is standing lonely inside the digital-landscape, taking its inspiration from the vaporwave aesthetic, reminiscent of the computer commercials of the 1980s and 1990s. Much like in medieval art, the mountain is disconnected from a realistic perspective, not actually trying to portray anything other than ideas and concepts. Taken together, the combination of these two inspirational sources represent what philosopher Žarko Paić called “the image without the world”, image artifacts that pop up in the landscape and no longer have a reference in time or space; nor do they have nature or history. They depict the haunting freedom of representation in terms of the artificiality of the virtual world.

[ARTWORKS AND THE SPECT-ACTOR TOUR]

The artworks themselves also function as images without a world. Entering the Purgatorio Mountain, we first see Léa Porré’s Royal Fate is Fluid, which follows Louis XVI's decapitated head, confronting us with the notion of Pride. On the second level, Yiming Yang’s 3D model Splice is a hybrid - a meeting between a spider and a human being, reflecting on whether the boundaries between technology and the body could trigger in us a feeling of Envy. Following this is another Cyborgian example by artist Anthr0morph, which investigates the non-human bodies in their performance on Instagram, perhaps evoking sentiments of Wrath. The fourth floor of Sloth lets us meet Yun Choi’s Where The Heart Goes, an exploration of the sense of banality in the collective faith behind common images.

Ballet Pathetique by Adam Basanta is on the fifth terrace, showing us the useless act of Greed as expressed in the orchestrated dance of simple oscillating fans. The sixth floor, that of Gluttony, is where Letta Shtohryn’s video Offshore Bakery, shows an investigative look into the financial meganetworks woven behind the romantic facade of Valletta's old town buildings. Getting to the top, we reach the seventh level of Lust, where Mor Afgin’s installation UXUI juxtaposes the life cycle of a biological bird with that of a Bird public scooter. Throughout the journey up the floors, a sound plays in the background. Taken from Yuwol June C's video-work I would lick to be someone else. The audio (created together with rapper Xéna N.C.) is separated from its visual source, evokes the vague feeling of being trapped inside an unknown quest.

At last, we arrive at the floor of Heavenly Paradise: this is where Ebstorfer World Map by Liliana Farber invites us to take a closer look at the crossing between the reality of Google Maps and that of world travelers from centuries ago. At this moment, the game changes. We perceive the Purgatorio Mountain from another perspective, as a moment of the Kantian sublime, as the image stretches on the screen beyond all previous limitations of the quest level design. After breaking the game’s grid, inciting a visceral meaning-making, the linear exhibition mode collapses, too: the viewer has to decide whether they want to get out of the maze, or go back to the Mountain and its artworks.

About Lital Bar-Noy

Lital Bar Noy is a user experience designer and a curator. She holds a B.Des from Shenkar Visual Communication and a M.A from Bezalel, Policy and Theory of the Arts. She was an exchange student in the Department of Critical Studies at the Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna, Austria. Received an academic merit award in 2018-2019. Bar Noy participated in Facebook’s international internship program and for the past two years has been working as a product designer at Microsoft.

About Ronnie Karfiol

Ronnie Karfiol is an artist. She holds a BFA in Arts from Shenkar college, Tel Aviv. She has also studied at the H.A.W. University Hamburg, Germany. Her work was shown in museums such as Petach Tikva Museum of Art & Nahum Guttman museum [IL] as well as in galleries like SPEKTRUM Berlin, Galleria R+ Poland & the Center of Contemporary Art (CCA) Tel Aviv. Her films screened at festivals, including DocAviv, Print Screen, EMAF Germany and Currents Festival, USA. She is the recipient of Margaret & Sylvan Adams Prize (2017), the Mifal HaPais Council for Arts (2018) and the Ministry of Culture Independent Artists’ grant (2019) and the Rabinovich Foundation (2020). In 2020 She was a web resident at the joint initiative between ZKM Museum and Akademie Solitude [DE]. In 2018, she was an artist-in-residence at Cripta747 [IT]. Her works are part of the collections in both the Guttman Museum [IL] and the Herzliya Museum of Contemporary Art [IL].

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Earth Angel Series

Photographs enhanced with photoshop, 2020.

Anthromorphs body changes shape and transforms to give room to as new body state. The collage was made in the first month of hormone transition of the artist. It represents and foreshadowed a body that is changing into a higher state of embodiment. The new body, has now sprouted, like a cordycepts infection, using the old dead testosterone body to grow into the angel series.

About Anthr0morph

Anthromorph’s visual language aims to abstract the body and present it as a form in the shape of the human. Inspired by transhuman and cyborg theory, with the use of silicone exoskeletons the body transforms into an animal hybrid state. The work is exhibited on instagram, which has infiltrated the social body and became a legitimised identification for the cyber social body. This way, transhuman representations on the platform allow the viewer to experience a type of humanness that wouldn't be able to otherwise. Similarily, Queer/non normative bodies often model as Anthromorphs and are celebrated through the lens. This way, Anthr0morph tries to bridge the gap between human and nature, similar to how 30 trillion individual different cells bond selflessly together to give life to one multicellular organism.

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I WOULD LiCK TO BE SOMEONE ELSE

excerpt from video work, 2021

[[ By entering this screen, you will experience a sound. You are about to discover a sound which undermines the automatic connection between silence and voice, often perceived as obvious. ]]] This part of the exhibition echoes the meeting between Dante and his friend Cassella at the Purgatory. In the meeting, Casella sings one of Dante’s poems to which he composed a melody. However, the listeners of this composed poem, Dante included, are later being reproached as they are yet to be fully purified, and therefore, their current spiritual state is seen as non deserving of this poem.

The video work I WOULD LiCK TO BE SOMEONE ELSE is a slow and quiet movement, which tells the story of an undeciphered character. Similar to the soul's long journey within the purgatorium, as in a cinematic show, fragments of bodies move in front of the viewer, as the character flickers and disappears in different and strange configurations. The images revealed on the screen range from familiar to strange, from shabby to luxurious. Similarly, just by listening to the audio part itself, the audience finds themselves in a limbo, ranging from an experience of alienation and detachment to a sense of familiarity and belonging. The slow, yet threatening and intense movement produces in the viewer a pendulum motion between staring and floating and examination and inquiry. Moreover, the Purge Pray Play exhibition asks to reinvent the relationship between what is being seen and what is being heard in the virtual realm. We suggest a new approach to the video work by first exposing the viewers solely to the audio part, and later on to the visual part as well by accessing [TheWrongTV/link] streaming page.

About Yuwol June C. [https://sites.google.com/view/k-otj] Yuwol June C. is a multidisciplinary artist, who uses a variety of mediums such as: performance, painting, video, installations, digital art and prints. The artist's works often counter the themes within the obscured borders of technology and humanity; and interrogating how new political, theoretical and social structures form and thrive in these new portals of being. The physical presence of the body, is a recurring motif in the artist’s body of works, emphasizing the allegorical contexts that accompany the existence of the body. The body appears in different personas and narratives, contrasting, intersecting, from Western and Eastern culture, female and male, breaks accepted dichotomies and offers in their place allegorical contexts that summon multiple meanings. Xéna N.C. Xéna N.C. is a queer Performer, Artivist, Rapper & Producer currently based in Vienna. She is the founder of the independent art collective JXL Productions where she is also the Video Director & Editor for several projects.

x

About Purge, Pray, Play

[ i ] - read about the exhibition
[ venus ] - read about the artist + artwork at this level
[ harp ] - experience the piece by Yuwol June C
[ locks ] each level opens a new lock. You can move and jump between open levels through the open locks.
[ purge, pray, play ] go back to the mountain. You can move between open levels through the mountain’s lit terraces
[ interact ] use your fingers to play/pause a video, zoom into a 3d model, scroll through a 3d image

[PADMENIC > LOOKING AT DANTE]

We are living in an era when the global collective is trying to resurrect itself from the wounds of a pandemic, unsure whether heaven will ever be back, or, perhaps, the hell of trying to tame an invisible virus is here to stay. Looking for some wisdom, we looked back to a classic - Dante Alleghieri’s seventh-levelled Purgatorio, the space between heaven and hell, the liminal crossing between paying for one’s sins and enjoying heaven’s delights. Although the notion of a purgatory, a transformative place for purging one’s sins, is very Christian in nature, similiar concepts exist within other traditions, too: Al A’raf in Islam, the Narakas in Buddhism, and the Barrelhaven in Judaism. The notion of climbing seven levels is also prevalent in ancient myths, like Inanna in the Underworld.

[PURGING > AS A RITUAL]

Traditionally, humans turned to different purging acts in order to cope with unknown viruses devouring their lives, literally and metaphorically. Humanity’s attempt at purifying itself from the virus’ threat isn’t completely rational, though we can find some reasoning for it. The purging act serves as a ritual act as well, playful at times, which taps into our age-old psyche and grants us some peace of mind. What is associated today with using hand sanitizing gel, or wearing a surgical mask, has been taking place centuries ago with the act of fumigation and other purging acts. We detect the playfulness in contemporary rituals and we intend to merge the experience of an art exhibition with a unique user experience giving a chance to actively engage, explore and build onto existing works as creative collaboration. The Purgatorio’s viewer will be the spect-actor, one who will activate the experience while submitting to the set logic of the purgatory, which demands their attention at viewing each level and its artworks to unlock the next level and so forth.

[ARTISTIC PRACTICE > VAPORWAVE AND MIDDLE AGES]

The Purgatorio Mountain, visually rendered by Ronnie Karfiol, is standing lonely inside the digital-landscape, taking its inspiration from the vaporwave aesthetic, reminiscent of the computer commercials of the 1980s and 1990s. Much like in medieval art, the mountain is disconnected from a realistic perspective, not actually trying to portray anything other than ideas and concepts. Taken together, the combination of these two inspirational sources represent what philosopher Žarko Paić called “the image without the world”, image artifacts that pop up in the landscape and no longer have a reference in time or space; nor do they have nature or history. They depict the haunting freedom of representation in terms of the artificiality of the virtual world.

[ARTWORKS AND THE SPECT-ACTOR TOUR]

The artworks themselves also function as images without a world. Entering the Purgatorio Mountain, we first see Léa Porré’s Royal Fate is Fluid, which follows Louis XVI's decapitated head, confronting us with the notion of Pride. On the second level, Yiming Yang’s 3D model Splice is a hybrid - a meeting between a spider and a human being, reflecting on whether the boundaries between technology and the body could trigger in us a feeling of Envy. Following this is another Cyborgian example by artist Anthr0morph, which investigates the non-human bodies in their performance on Instagram, perhaps evoking sentiments of Wrath. The fourth floor of Sloth lets us meet Yun Choi’s Where The Heart Goes, an exploration of the sense of banality in the collective faith behind common images.

Ballet Pathetique by Adam Basanta is on the fifth terrace, showing us the useless act of Greed as expressed in the orchestrated dance of simple oscillating fans. The sixth floor, that of Gluttony, is where Letta Shtohryn’s video Offshore Bakery, shows an investigative look into the financial meganetworks woven behind the romantic facade of Valletta's old town buildings. Getting to the top, we reach the seventh level of Lust, where Mor Afgin’s installation UXUI juxtaposes the life cycle of a biological bird with that of a Bird public scooter. Throughout the journey up the floors, a sound plays in the background. Taken from Yuwol June C's video-work I would lick to be someone else. The audio (created together with rapper Xéna N.C.) is separated from its visual source, evokes the vague feeling of being trapped inside an unknown quest.

At last, we arrive at the floor of Heavenly Paradise: this is where Ebstorfer World Map by Liliana Farber invites us to take a closer look at the crossing between the reality of Google Maps and that of world travelers from centuries ago. At this moment, the game changes. We perceive the Purgatorio Mountain from another perspective, as a moment of the Kantian sublime, as the image stretches on the screen beyond all previous limitations of the quest level design. After breaking the game’s grid, inciting a visceral meaning-making, the linear exhibition mode collapses, too: the viewer has to decide whether they want to get out of the maze, or go back to the Mountain and its artworks.

About Lital Bar-Noy

Lital Bar Noy is a user experience designer and a curator. She holds a B.Des from Shenkar Visual Communication and a M.A from Bezalel, Policy and Theory of the Arts. She was an exchange student in the Department of Critical Studies at the Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna, Austria. Received an academic merit award in 2018-2019. Bar Noy participated in Facebook’s international internship program and for the past two years has been working as a product designer at Microsoft.

About Ronnie Karfiol

Ronnie Karfiol is an artist. She holds a BFA in Arts from Shenkar college, Tel Aviv. She has also studied at the H.A.W. University Hamburg, Germany. Her work was shown in museums such as Petach Tikva Museum of Art & Nahum Guttman museum [IL] as well as in galleries like SPEKTRUM Berlin, Galleria R+ Poland & the Center of Contemporary Art (CCA) Tel Aviv. Her films screened at festivals, including DocAviv, Print Screen, EMAF Germany and Currents Festival, USA. She is the recipient of Margaret & Sylvan Adams Prize (2017), the Mifal HaPais Council for Arts (2018) and the Ministry of Culture Independent Artists’ grant (2019) and the Rabinovich Foundation (2020). In 2020 She was a web resident at the joint initiative between ZKM Museum and Akademie Solitude [DE]. In 2018, she was an artist-in-residence at Cripta747 [IT]. Her works are part of the collections in both the Guttman Museum [IL] and the Herzliya Museum of Contemporary Art [IL].

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Where the Heart Goes

1:57 Single channel video, Sound (Excerpt from full 30min. single-channel video, 30 min 30 sec, color, sound), 2021.

Choi’s interest lies in cliché images and the sense of banality in the collective faith hidden behind such images. She collects common and banal images floating around in the streets, public places and in popular culture, playing variations on them through her video, installation and performative works as well as ‘posting’ and ‘updating' her previous works. This way she accumulates the strange and uncanny responses and sensations that arise in such space. ‘Where the heart goes’ is a literal expression, one that is excessively mundane. The conventional notion in the word ‘heart’ gives the expression a sense of steadfastness and purity. However, in reality, the way the heart goes is at times fickle and temporal.

About Yun Choi

In her body of works, Yun Choi captures and compiles scenes that create a social climate, and repurposes them for her works, which include videos, mixed media installations, and performances. Interested in pedestrian and conventional images, words, behaviors of contemporary Korean society. Her work was featured in several exhibitions at key galleries and museums, DOOSAN Gallery Seoul and New York (2020), Art Sonje Center project space (2017), and participated in group exhibitions held at Asia Culture Center (2020), Art Sonje Center (2019), Arko Art Museum (2019), Busan Biennale (2018), the Gwangju Biennale’s satellite exhibition (2018), Buk-Seoul Museum of Art (2017), Kukje Gallery (2017), Seoul Museum of Art (2016) and more.

x
Unlock next floor >

I WOULD LiCK TO BE SOMEONE ELSE

excerpt from video work, 2021

[[ By entering this screen, you will experience a sound. You are about to discover a sound which undermines the automatic connection between silence and voice, often perceived as obvious. ]]] This part of the exhibition echoes the meeting between Dante and his friend Cassella at the Purgatory. In the meeting, Casella sings one of Dante’s poems to which he composed a melody. However, the listeners of this composed poem, Dante included, are later being reproached as they are yet to be fully purified, and therefore, their current spiritual state is seen as non deserving of this poem.

The video work I WOULD LiCK TO BE SOMEONE ELSE is a slow and quiet movement, which tells the story of an undeciphered character. Similar to the soul's long journey within the purgatorium, as in a cinematic show, fragments of bodies move in front of the viewer, as the character flickers and disappears in different and strange configurations. The images revealed on the screen range from familiar to strange, from shabby to luxurious. Similarly, just by listening to the audio part itself, the audience finds themselves in a limbo, ranging from an experience of alienation and detachment to a sense of familiarity and belonging. The slow, yet threatening and intense movement produces in the viewer a pendulum motion between staring and floating and examination and inquiry. Moreover, the Purge Pray Play exhibition asks to reinvent the relationship between what is being seen and what is being heard in the virtual realm. We suggest a new approach to the video work by first exposing the viewers solely to the audio part, and later on to the visual part as well by accessing [TheWrongTV/link] streaming page.

About Yuwol June C. [https://sites.google.com/view/k-otj] Yuwol June C. is a multidisciplinary artist, who uses a variety of mediums such as: performance, painting, video, installations, digital art and prints. The artist's works often counter the themes within the obscured borders of technology and humanity; and interrogating how new political, theoretical and social structures form and thrive in these new portals of being. The physical presence of the body, is a recurring motif in the artist’s body of works, emphasizing the allegorical contexts that accompany the existence of the body. The body appears in different personas and narratives, contrasting, intersecting, from Western and Eastern culture, female and male, breaks accepted dichotomies and offers in their place allegorical contexts that summon multiple meanings. Xéna N.C. Xéna N.C. is a queer Performer, Artivist, Rapper & Producer currently based in Vienna. She is the founder of the independent art collective JXL Productions where she is also the Video Director & Editor for several projects.

x

About Purge, Pray, Play

[ i ] - read about the exhibition
[ venus ] - read about the artist + artwork at this level
[ harp ] - experience the piece by Yuwol June C
[ locks ] each level opens a new lock. You can move and jump between open levels through the open locks.
[ purge, pray, play ] go back to the mountain. You can move between open levels through the mountain’s lit terraces
[ interact ] use your fingers to play/pause a video, zoom into a 3d model, scroll through a 3d image

[PADMENIC > LOOKING AT DANTE]

We are living in an era when the global collective is trying to resurrect itself from the wounds of a pandemic, unsure whether heaven will ever be back, or, perhaps, the hell of trying to tame an invisible virus is here to stay. Looking for some wisdom, we looked back to a classic - Dante Alleghieri’s seventh-levelled Purgatorio, the space between heaven and hell, the liminal crossing between paying for one’s sins and enjoying heaven’s delights. Although the notion of a purgatory, a transformative place for purging one’s sins, is very Christian in nature, similiar concepts exist within other traditions, too: Al A’raf in Islam, the Narakas in Buddhism, and the Barrelhaven in Judaism. The notion of climbing seven levels is also prevalent in ancient myths, like Inanna in the Underworld.

[PURGING > AS A RITUAL]

Traditionally, humans turned to different purging acts in order to cope with unknown viruses devouring their lives, literally and metaphorically. Humanity’s attempt at purifying itself from the virus’ threat isn’t completely rational, though we can find some reasoning for it. The purging act serves as a ritual act as well, playful at times, which taps into our age-old psyche and grants us some peace of mind. What is associated today with using hand sanitizing gel, or wearing a surgical mask, has been taking place centuries ago with the act of fumigation and other purging acts. We detect the playfulness in contemporary rituals and we intend to merge the experience of an art exhibition with a unique user experience giving a chance to actively engage, explore and build onto existing works as creative collaboration. The Purgatorio’s viewer will be the spect-actor, one who will activate the experience while submitting to the set logic of the purgatory, which demands their attention at viewing each level and its artworks to unlock the next level and so forth.

[ARTISTIC PRACTICE > VAPORWAVE AND MIDDLE AGES]

The Purgatorio Mountain, visually rendered by Ronnie Karfiol, is standing lonely inside the digital-landscape, taking its inspiration from the vaporwave aesthetic, reminiscent of the computer commercials of the 1980s and 1990s. Much like in medieval art, the mountain is disconnected from a realistic perspective, not actually trying to portray anything other than ideas and concepts. Taken together, the combination of these two inspirational sources represent what philosopher Žarko Paić called “the image without the world”, image artifacts that pop up in the landscape and no longer have a reference in time or space; nor do they have nature or history. They depict the haunting freedom of representation in terms of the artificiality of the virtual world.

[ARTWORKS AND THE SPECT-ACTOR TOUR]

The artworks themselves also function as images without a world. Entering the Purgatorio Mountain, we first see Léa Porré’s Royal Fate is Fluid, which follows Louis XVI's decapitated head, confronting us with the notion of Pride. On the second level, Yiming Yang’s 3D model Splice is a hybrid - a meeting between a spider and a human being, reflecting on whether the boundaries between technology and the body could trigger in us a feeling of Envy. Following this is another Cyborgian example by artist Anthr0morph, which investigates the non-human bodies in their performance on Instagram, perhaps evoking sentiments of Wrath. The fourth floor of Sloth lets us meet Yun Choi’s Where The Heart Goes, an exploration of the sense of banality in the collective faith behind common images.

Ballet Pathetique by Adam Basanta is on the fifth terrace, showing us the useless act of Greed as expressed in the orchestrated dance of simple oscillating fans. The sixth floor, that of Gluttony, is where Letta Shtohryn’s video Offshore Bakery, shows an investigative look into the financial meganetworks woven behind the romantic facade of Valletta's old town buildings. Getting to the top, we reach the seventh level of Lust, where Mor Afgin’s installation UXUI juxtaposes the life cycle of a biological bird with that of a Bird public scooter. Throughout the journey up the floors, a sound plays in the background. Taken from Yuwol June C's video-work I would lick to be someone else. The audio (created together with rapper Xéna N.C.) is separated from its visual source, evokes the vague feeling of being trapped inside an unknown quest.

At last, we arrive at the floor of Heavenly Paradise: this is where Ebstorfer World Map by Liliana Farber invites us to take a closer look at the crossing between the reality of Google Maps and that of world travelers from centuries ago. At this moment, the game changes. We perceive the Purgatorio Mountain from another perspective, as a moment of the Kantian sublime, as the image stretches on the screen beyond all previous limitations of the quest level design. After breaking the game’s grid, inciting a visceral meaning-making, the linear exhibition mode collapses, too: the viewer has to decide whether they want to get out of the maze, or go back to the Mountain and its artworks.

About Lital Bar-Noy

Lital Bar Noy is a user experience designer and a curator. She holds a B.Des from Shenkar Visual Communication and a M.A from Bezalel, Policy and Theory of the Arts. She was an exchange student in the Department of Critical Studies at the Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna, Austria. Received an academic merit award in 2018-2019. Bar Noy participated in Facebook’s international internship program and for the past two years has been working as a product designer at Microsoft.

About Ronnie Karfiol

Ronnie Karfiol is an artist. She holds a BFA in Arts from Shenkar college, Tel Aviv. She has also studied at the H.A.W. University Hamburg, Germany. Her work was shown in museums such as Petach Tikva Museum of Art & Nahum Guttman museum [IL] as well as in galleries like SPEKTRUM Berlin, Galleria R+ Poland & the Center of Contemporary Art (CCA) Tel Aviv. Her films screened at festivals, including DocAviv, Print Screen, EMAF Germany and Currents Festival, USA. She is the recipient of Margaret & Sylvan Adams Prize (2017), the Mifal HaPais Council for Arts (2018) and the Ministry of Culture Independent Artists’ grant (2019) and the Rabinovich Foundation (2020). In 2020 She was a web resident at the joint initiative between ZKM Museum and Akademie Solitude [DE]. In 2018, she was an artist-in-residence at Cripta747 [IT]. Her works are part of the collections in both the Guttman Museum [IL] and the Herzliya Museum of Contemporary Art [IL].

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Ballet Pathetique

Mixed-media installation. 2019. ~3.5m x 3.5m x 1m. 12 oscillating fans, elastic ribbon, door stoppers, CRT television, soundtrack of selected arias from J.S. Bach's "The Passion of St. Matthews".

A circle of oscillating fans resting on their backs forms around a large CRT television. As if holding hands, the fans sway side to side, simultaneously exerting pressure on one another while supporting each other from falling; a collective pathetic writhing, desperate to lift off the ground. A recording of a single fan plays on the CRT television, accompanied by a selection of arias for soloist and ensemble from J.S. Bach's "The Passion of St. Matthews". With its musical accompaniment, the assemblage is transformed to stylized dance. A soloist and ensemble; a techno-primeval gathering around a television, the contemporary fireplace; a final blurring between the virtual and the real. As the dance goes on, sculptural form is extended beyond the objects and their kineticism, and begins to include the column of cool air formed within the gallery space. Ballet Pathetique

About Adam Basanta

Adam Basanta (b. 1985) is an artist, composer, and performer of experimental music. Born in Tel-Aviv (ISR) and raised in Vancouver (CAN), He holds a BFA in Music composition from Simon Fraser University (Vancouver BC CAN) and an interdisciplinary Research-Creation MA in Fine Arts (Concordia University, Montreal QC CAN). Basanta investigates technology as a meeting point of concurrent, overlapping systems; a nexus of cultural, computational, biological, and economic forces. Through a variety of media - installation, kinetic sculpture, sound, computational image-making he employs the visual culture of commercial technologies as a core vocabulary, displacing them into an artistic context. Placing technologies in unconventional and absurd relationships to one another, he aims to create a fissure in their conventional functions, reflecting on their roles as contemporary prosthetics with which we co-exist in a hybrid ecology.

x
Unlock next floor >

I WOULD LiCK TO BE SOMEONE ELSE

excerpt from video work, 2021

[[ By entering this screen, you will experience a sound. You are about to discover a sound which undermines the automatic connection between silence and voice, often perceived as obvious. ]]] This part of the exhibition echoes the meeting between Dante and his friend Cassella at the Purgatory. In the meeting, Casella sings one of Dante’s poems to which he composed a melody. However, the listeners of this composed poem, Dante included, are later being reproached as they are yet to be fully purified, and therefore, their current spiritual state is seen as non deserving of this poem.

The video work I WOULD LiCK TO BE SOMEONE ELSE is a slow and quiet movement, which tells the story of an undeciphered character. Similar to the soul's long journey within the purgatorium, as in a cinematic show, fragments of bodies move in front of the viewer, as the character flickers and disappears in different and strange configurations. The images revealed on the screen range from familiar to strange, from shabby to luxurious. Similarly, just by listening to the audio part itself, the audience finds themselves in a limbo, ranging from an experience of alienation and detachment to a sense of familiarity and belonging. The slow, yet threatening and intense movement produces in the viewer a pendulum motion between staring and floating and examination and inquiry. Moreover, the Purge Pray Play exhibition asks to reinvent the relationship between what is being seen and what is being heard in the virtual realm. We suggest a new approach to the video work by first exposing the viewers solely to the audio part, and later on to the visual part as well by accessing [TheWrongTV/link] streaming page.

About Yuwol June C. [https://sites.google.com/view/k-otj] Yuwol June C. is a multidisciplinary artist, who uses a variety of mediums such as: performance, painting, video, installations, digital art and prints. The artist's works often counter the themes within the obscured borders of technology and humanity; and interrogating how new political, theoretical and social structures form and thrive in these new portals of being. The physical presence of the body, is a recurring motif in the artist’s body of works, emphasizing the allegorical contexts that accompany the existence of the body. The body appears in different personas and narratives, contrasting, intersecting, from Western and Eastern culture, female and male, breaks accepted dichotomies and offers in their place allegorical contexts that summon multiple meanings. Xéna N.C. Xéna N.C. is a queer Performer, Artivist, Rapper & Producer currently based in Vienna. She is the founder of the independent art collective JXL Productions where she is also the Video Director & Editor for several projects.

x

About Purge, Pray, Play

[ i ] - read about the exhibition
[ venus ] - read about the artist + artwork at this level
[ harp ] - experience the piece by Yuwol June C
[ locks ] each level opens a new lock. You can move and jump between open levels through the open locks.
[ purge, pray, play ] go back to the mountain. You can move between open levels through the mountain’s lit terraces
[ interact ] use your fingers to play/pause a video, zoom into a 3d model, scroll through a 3d image

[PADMENIC > LOOKING AT DANTE]

We are living in an era when the global collective is trying to resurrect itself from the wounds of a pandemic, unsure whether heaven will ever be back, or, perhaps, the hell of trying to tame an invisible virus is here to stay. Looking for some wisdom, we looked back to a classic - Dante Alleghieri’s seventh-levelled Purgatorio, the space between heaven and hell, the liminal crossing between paying for one’s sins and enjoying heaven’s delights. Although the notion of a purgatory, a transformative place for purging one’s sins, is very Christian in nature, similiar concepts exist within other traditions, too: Al A’raf in Islam, the Narakas in Buddhism, and the Barrelhaven in Judaism. The notion of climbing seven levels is also prevalent in ancient myths, like Inanna in the Underworld.

[PURGING > AS A RITUAL]

Traditionally, humans turned to different purging acts in order to cope with unknown viruses devouring their lives, literally and metaphorically. Humanity’s attempt at purifying itself from the virus’ threat isn’t completely rational, though we can find some reasoning for it. The purging act serves as a ritual act as well, playful at times, which taps into our age-old psyche and grants us some peace of mind. What is associated today with using hand sanitizing gel, or wearing a surgical mask, has been taking place centuries ago with the act of fumigation and other purging acts. We detect the playfulness in contemporary rituals and we intend to merge the experience of an art exhibition with a unique user experience giving a chance to actively engage, explore and build onto existing works as creative collaboration. The Purgatorio’s viewer will be the spect-actor, one who will activate the experience while submitting to the set logic of the purgatory, which demands their attention at viewing each level and its artworks to unlock the next level and so forth.

[ARTISTIC PRACTICE > VAPORWAVE AND MIDDLE AGES]

The Purgatorio Mountain, visually rendered by Ronnie Karfiol, is standing lonely inside the digital-landscape, taking its inspiration from the vaporwave aesthetic, reminiscent of the computer commercials of the 1980s and 1990s. Much like in medieval art, the mountain is disconnected from a realistic perspective, not actually trying to portray anything other than ideas and concepts. Taken together, the combination of these two inspirational sources represent what philosopher Žarko Paić called “the image without the world”, image artifacts that pop up in the landscape and no longer have a reference in time or space; nor do they have nature or history. They depict the haunting freedom of representation in terms of the artificiality of the virtual world.

[ARTWORKS AND THE SPECT-ACTOR TOUR]

The artworks themselves also function as images without a world. Entering the Purgatorio Mountain, we first see Léa Porré’s Royal Fate is Fluid, which follows Louis XVI's decapitated head, confronting us with the notion of Pride. On the second level, Yiming Yang’s 3D model Splice is a hybrid - a meeting between a spider and a human being, reflecting on whether the boundaries between technology and the body could trigger in us a feeling of Envy. Following this is another Cyborgian example by artist Anthr0morph, which investigates the non-human bodies in their performance on Instagram, perhaps evoking sentiments of Wrath. The fourth floor of Sloth lets us meet Yun Choi’s Where The Heart Goes, an exploration of the sense of banality in the collective faith behind common images.

Ballet Pathetique by Adam Basanta is on the fifth terrace, showing us the useless act of Greed as expressed in the orchestrated dance of simple oscillating fans. The sixth floor, that of Gluttony, is where Letta Shtohryn’s video Offshore Bakery, shows an investigative look into the financial meganetworks woven behind the romantic facade of Valletta's old town buildings. Getting to the top, we reach the seventh level of Lust, where Mor Afgin’s installation UXUI juxtaposes the life cycle of a biological bird with that of a Bird public scooter. Throughout the journey up the floors, a sound plays in the background. Taken from Yuwol June C's video-work I would lick to be someone else. The audio (created together with rapper Xéna N.C.) is separated from its visual source, evokes the vague feeling of being trapped inside an unknown quest.

At last, we arrive at the floor of Heavenly Paradise: this is where Ebstorfer World Map by Liliana Farber invites us to take a closer look at the crossing between the reality of Google Maps and that of world travelers from centuries ago. At this moment, the game changes. We perceive the Purgatorio Mountain from another perspective, as a moment of the Kantian sublime, as the image stretches on the screen beyond all previous limitations of the quest level design. After breaking the game’s grid, inciting a visceral meaning-making, the linear exhibition mode collapses, too: the viewer has to decide whether they want to get out of the maze, or go back to the Mountain and its artworks.

About Lital Bar-Noy

Lital Bar Noy is a user experience designer and a curator. She holds a B.Des from Shenkar Visual Communication and a M.A from Bezalel, Policy and Theory of the Arts. She was an exchange student in the Department of Critical Studies at the Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna, Austria. Received an academic merit award in 2018-2019. Bar Noy participated in Facebook’s international internship program and for the past two years has been working as a product designer at Microsoft.

About Ronnie Karfiol

Ronnie Karfiol is an artist. She holds a BFA in Arts from Shenkar college, Tel Aviv. She has also studied at the H.A.W. University Hamburg, Germany. Her work was shown in museums such as Petach Tikva Museum of Art & Nahum Guttman museum [IL] as well as in galleries like SPEKTRUM Berlin, Galleria R+ Poland & the Center of Contemporary Art (CCA) Tel Aviv. Her films screened at festivals, including DocAviv, Print Screen, EMAF Germany and Currents Festival, USA. She is the recipient of Margaret & Sylvan Adams Prize (2017), the Mifal HaPais Council for Arts (2018) and the Ministry of Culture Independent Artists’ grant (2019) and the Rabinovich Foundation (2020). In 2020 She was a web resident at the joint initiative between ZKM Museum and Akademie Solitude [DE]. In 2018, she was an artist-in-residence at Cripta747 [IT]. Her works are part of the collections in both the Guttman Museum [IL] and the Herzliya Museum of Contemporary Art [IL].

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About Offshore Bakery

Single channel video, audio, 2:22 min. (sound – Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, 2002.

The work looks at offshore schemes and the global spider-web of interconnected companies. Offshore bakery refers to an alternative reality of the Old Bakery Street in Valletta; where once were bakeries, now are offices. They appear to be regular buildings, but they are something else behind a magic protective shield. When one stands close enough and knows when and where to look, they extend to incredible proportions, almost liquid, elastic, presenting the recently unveiled world of global offshore connection, shell companies and trusts. Some buildings host thousands of companies, their extraordinary invisible power extending endlessly on the inside. Once you have crossed the protective shield, all the tenants are revealed, and you are observing the magic universe of secrecy, offshore trading and global tax evasion.

About Letta Shtohryn

Letta Shtohryn (UA/MT) works predominantly with new media, sculpture and imagery. Her academic background is in Philosophy/Sociology (Uni Wien), Photography (The Vienna Art School) and Digital Art (MFA @UM). She is currently a Research Excellence Fellow at The Immersive Lab, University of Malta.

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Unlock next floor >

I WOULD LiCK TO BE SOMEONE ELSE

excerpt from video work, 2021

[[ By entering this screen, you will experience a sound. You are about to discover a sound which undermines the automatic connection between silence and voice, often perceived as obvious. ]]] This part of the exhibition echoes the meeting between Dante and his friend Cassella at the Purgatory. In the meeting, Casella sings one of Dante’s poems to which he composed a melody. However, the listeners of this composed poem, Dante included, are later being reproached as they are yet to be fully purified, and therefore, their current spiritual state is seen as non deserving of this poem.

The video work I WOULD LiCK TO BE SOMEONE ELSE is a slow and quiet movement, which tells the story of an undeciphered character. Similar to the soul's long journey within the purgatorium, as in a cinematic show, fragments of bodies move in front of the viewer, as the character flickers and disappears in different and strange configurations. The images revealed on the screen range from familiar to strange, from shabby to luxurious. Similarly, just by listening to the audio part itself, the audience finds themselves in a limbo, ranging from an experience of alienation and detachment to a sense of familiarity and belonging. The slow, yet threatening and intense movement produces in the viewer a pendulum motion between staring and floating and examination and inquiry. Moreover, the Purge Pray Play exhibition asks to reinvent the relationship between what is being seen and what is being heard in the virtual realm. We suggest a new approach to the video work by first exposing the viewers solely to the audio part, and later on to the visual part as well by accessing [TheWrongTV/link] streaming page.

About Yuwol June C. [https://sites.google.com/view/k-otj] Yuwol June C. is a multidisciplinary artist, who uses a variety of mediums such as: performance, painting, video, installations, digital art and prints. The artist's works often counter the themes within the obscured borders of technology and humanity; and interrogating how new political, theoretical and social structures form and thrive in these new portals of being. The physical presence of the body, is a recurring motif in the artist’s body of works, emphasizing the allegorical contexts that accompany the existence of the body. The body appears in different personas and narratives, contrasting, intersecting, from Western and Eastern culture, female and male, breaks accepted dichotomies and offers in their place allegorical contexts that summon multiple meanings. Xéna N.C. Xéna N.C. is a queer Performer, Artivist, Rapper & Producer currently based in Vienna. She is the founder of the independent art collective JXL Productions where she is also the Video Director & Editor for several projects.

x

About Purge, Pray, Play

[ i ] - read about the exhibition
[ venus ] - read about the artist + artwork at this level
[ harp ] - experience the piece by Yuwol June C
[ locks ] each level opens a new lock. You can move and jump between open levels through the open locks.
[ purge, pray, play ] go back to the mountain. You can move between open levels through the mountain’s lit terraces
[ interact ] use your fingers to play/pause a video, zoom into a 3d model, scroll through a 3d image

[PADMENIC > LOOKING AT DANTE]

We are living in an era when the global collective is trying to resurrect itself from the wounds of a pandemic, unsure whether heaven will ever be back, or, perhaps, the hell of trying to tame an invisible virus is here to stay. Looking for some wisdom, we looked back to a classic - Dante Alleghieri’s seventh-levelled Purgatorio, the space between heaven and hell, the liminal crossing between paying for one’s sins and enjoying heaven’s delights. Although the notion of a purgatory, a transformative place for purging one’s sins, is very Christian in nature, similiar concepts exist within other traditions, too: Al A’raf in Islam, the Narakas in Buddhism, and the Barrelhaven in Judaism. The notion of climbing seven levels is also prevalent in ancient myths, like Inanna in the Underworld.

[PURGING > AS A RITUAL]

Traditionally, humans turned to different purging acts in order to cope with unknown viruses devouring their lives, literally and metaphorically. Humanity’s attempt at purifying itself from the virus’ threat isn’t completely rational, though we can find some reasoning for it. The purging act serves as a ritual act as well, playful at times, which taps into our age-old psyche and grants us some peace of mind. What is associated today with using hand sanitizing gel, or wearing a surgical mask, has been taking place centuries ago with the act of fumigation and other purging acts. We detect the playfulness in contemporary rituals and we intend to merge the experience of an art exhibition with a unique user experience giving a chance to actively engage, explore and build onto existing works as creative collaboration. The Purgatorio’s viewer will be the spect-actor, one who will activate the experience while submitting to the set logic of the purgatory, which demands their attention at viewing each level and its artworks to unlock the next level and so forth.

[ARTISTIC PRACTICE > VAPORWAVE AND MIDDLE AGES]

The Purgatorio Mountain, visually rendered by Ronnie Karfiol, is standing lonely inside the digital-landscape, taking its inspiration from the vaporwave aesthetic, reminiscent of the computer commercials of the 1980s and 1990s. Much like in medieval art, the mountain is disconnected from a realistic perspective, not actually trying to portray anything other than ideas and concepts. Taken together, the combination of these two inspirational sources represent what philosopher Žarko Paić called “the image without the world”, image artifacts that pop up in the landscape and no longer have a reference in time or space; nor do they have nature or history. They depict the haunting freedom of representation in terms of the artificiality of the virtual world.

[ARTWORKS AND THE SPECT-ACTOR TOUR]

The artworks themselves also function as images without a world. Entering the Purgatorio Mountain, we first see Léa Porré’s Royal Fate is Fluid, which follows Louis XVI's decapitated head, confronting us with the notion of Pride. On the second level, Yiming Yang’s 3D model Splice is a hybrid - a meeting between a spider and a human being, reflecting on whether the boundaries between technology and the body could trigger in us a feeling of Envy. Following this is another Cyborgian example by artist Anthr0morph, which investigates the non-human bodies in their performance on Instagram, perhaps evoking sentiments of Wrath. The fourth floor of Sloth lets us meet Yun Choi’s Where The Heart Goes, an exploration of the sense of banality in the collective faith behind common images.

Ballet Pathetique by Adam Basanta is on the fifth terrace, showing us the useless act of Greed as expressed in the orchestrated dance of simple oscillating fans. The sixth floor, that of Gluttony, is where Letta Shtohryn’s video Offshore Bakery, shows an investigative look into the financial meganetworks woven behind the romantic facade of Valletta's old town buildings. Getting to the top, we reach the seventh level of Lust, where Mor Afgin’s installation UXUI juxtaposes the life cycle of a biological bird with that of a Bird public scooter. Throughout the journey up the floors, a sound plays in the background. Taken from Yuwol June C's video-work I would lick to be someone else. The audio (created together with rapper Xéna N.C.) is separated from its visual source, evokes the vague feeling of being trapped inside an unknown quest.

At last, we arrive at the floor of Heavenly Paradise: this is where Ebstorfer World Map by Liliana Farber invites us to take a closer look at the crossing between the reality of Google Maps and that of world travelers from centuries ago. At this moment, the game changes. We perceive the Purgatorio Mountain from another perspective, as a moment of the Kantian sublime, as the image stretches on the screen beyond all previous limitations of the quest level design. After breaking the game’s grid, inciting a visceral meaning-making, the linear exhibition mode collapses, too: the viewer has to decide whether they want to get out of the maze, or go back to the Mountain and its artworks.

About Lital Bar-Noy

Lital Bar Noy is a user experience designer and a curator. She holds a B.Des from Shenkar Visual Communication and a M.A from Bezalel, Policy and Theory of the Arts. She was an exchange student in the Department of Critical Studies at the Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna, Austria. Received an academic merit award in 2018-2019. Bar Noy participated in Facebook’s international internship program and for the past two years has been working as a product designer at Microsoft.

About Ronnie Karfiol

Ronnie Karfiol is an artist. She holds a BFA in Arts from Shenkar college, Tel Aviv. She has also studied at the H.A.W. University Hamburg, Germany. Her work was shown in museums such as Petach Tikva Museum of Art & Nahum Guttman museum [IL] as well as in galleries like SPEKTRUM Berlin, Galleria R+ Poland & the Center of Contemporary Art (CCA) Tel Aviv. Her films screened at festivals, including DocAviv, Print Screen, EMAF Germany and Currents Festival, USA. She is the recipient of Margaret & Sylvan Adams Prize (2017), the Mifal HaPais Council for Arts (2018) and the Ministry of Culture Independent Artists’ grant (2019) and the Rabinovich Foundation (2020). In 2020 She was a web resident at the joint initiative between ZKM Museum and Akademie Solitude [DE]. In 2018, she was an artist-in-residence at Cripta747 [IT]. Her works are part of the collections in both the Guttman Museum [IL] and the Herzliya Museum of Contemporary Art [IL].

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About UXUI

Bird public scooter, disassembled. 150x100x20cm. Bird Feeder 3D Printed PLA parts Pyrex glass tube, live spirulina, water, Sodium Bicarbonate, Potassium nitrate, air pump, airstone UV full spectrum light Sillicone and PU tubing. 190x20x20cm. Wearing machine V5 (Sea waves) 3D printed PLA parts jar, sea sand, shells and sea waters, brushed aluminum, painted metal glass Cucumbers, garlic, dill, salt, water and rocks. 20x40x120cm

UXUI is a site specific installation designed for a single viewer. It is composed of three elements: One, the disassembled body of a BIRD public scooter, partly embedded in the gallery’s floor. Two, a large scale bird feeder, filled with water, in which living spirulina culture develops under a UV lamp. Three, a glass jar with a collection from the Mediterranean sea - sea shells and sea waters rolled in a wearing machine. This contraption was placed on top of a Pressure resistant glass container in which cucumbers are being fermented. Afgin experiments with living organisms and natural matter within hermetic systems over time.

About Mor Afgin

Israeli artist, born 1990. Graduate of the BFA in Bezalel Academy of Art and Design, and an erasmus program at UdK Berlin, Germany. Winner of Cooper Prize (2017) and Pecker Prize (2019). Afgin works mainly in sculpture and installation and new-media, creating physical and digital systems with poetic meaning beyond their technological facade. He takes inspiration from the internet culture and the freedom of DIY culture and the freedom of information in the era of digital communication. He has exhibited in Haifa Museums, The Midrasha Gallery and Gerem Gallery Jerusalem (2021) Printscreen Festival (2018, 2019) among others.

x

Unlock next floor >

I WOULD LiCK TO BE SOMEONE ELSE

excerpt from video work, 2021

[[ By entering this screen, you will experience a sound. You are about to discover a sound which undermines the automatic connection between silence and voice, often perceived as obvious. ]]] This part of the exhibition echoes the meeting between Dante and his friend Cassella at the Purgatory. In the meeting, Casella sings one of Dante’s poems to which he composed a melody. However, the listeners of this composed poem, Dante included, are later being reproached as they are yet to be fully purified, and therefore, their current spiritual state is seen as non deserving of this poem.

The video work I WOULD LiCK TO BE SOMEONE ELSE is a slow and quiet movement, which tells the story of an undeciphered character. Similar to the soul's long journey within the purgatorium, as in a cinematic show, fragments of bodies move in front of the viewer, as the character flickers and disappears in different and strange configurations. The images revealed on the screen range from familiar to strange, from shabby to luxurious. Similarly, just by listening to the audio part itself, the audience finds themselves in a limbo, ranging from an experience of alienation and detachment to a sense of familiarity and belonging. The slow, yet threatening and intense movement produces in the viewer a pendulum motion between staring and floating and examination and inquiry. Moreover, the Purge Pray Play exhibition asks to reinvent the relationship between what is being seen and what is being heard in the virtual realm. We suggest a new approach to the video work by first exposing the viewers solely to the audio part, and later on to the visual part as well by accessing [TheWrongTV/link] streaming page.

About Yuwol June C. [https://sites.google.com/view/k-otj] Yuwol June C. is a multidisciplinary artist, who uses a variety of mediums such as: performance, painting, video, installations, digital art and prints. The artist's works often counter the themes within the obscured borders of technology and humanity; and interrogating how new political, theoretical and social structures form and thrive in these new portals of being. The physical presence of the body, is a recurring motif in the artist’s body of works, emphasizing the allegorical contexts that accompany the existence of the body. The body appears in different personas and narratives, contrasting, intersecting, from Western and Eastern culture, female and male, breaks accepted dichotomies and offers in their place allegorical contexts that summon multiple meanings. Xéna N.C. Xéna N.C. is a queer Performer, Artivist, Rapper & Producer currently based in Vienna. She is the founder of the independent art collective JXL Productions where she is also the Video Director & Editor for several projects.

x

About Purge, Pray, Play

[ i ] - read about the exhibition
[ venus ] - read about the artist + artwork at this level
[ harp ] - experience the piece by Yuwol June C
[ locks ] each level opens a new lock. You can move and jump between open levels through the open locks.
[ purge, pray, play ] go back to the mountain. You can move between open levels through the mountain’s lit terraces
[ interact ] use your fingers to play/pause a video, zoom into a 3d model, scroll through a 3d image

[PADMENIC > LOOKING AT DANTE]

We are living in an era when the global collective is trying to resurrect itself from the wounds of a pandemic, unsure whether heaven will ever be back, or, perhaps, the hell of trying to tame an invisible virus is here to stay. Looking for some wisdom, we looked back to a classic - Dante Alleghieri’s seventh-levelled Purgatorio, the space between heaven and hell, the liminal crossing between paying for one’s sins and enjoying heaven’s delights. Although the notion of a purgatory, a transformative place for purging one’s sins, is very Christian in nature, similiar concepts exist within other traditions, too: Al A’raf in Islam, the Narakas in Buddhism, and the Barrelhaven in Judaism. The notion of climbing seven levels is also prevalent in ancient myths, like Inanna in the Underworld.

[PURGING > AS A RITUAL]

Traditionally, humans turned to different purging acts in order to cope with unknown viruses devouring their lives, literally and metaphorically. Humanity’s attempt at purifying itself from the virus’ threat isn’t completely rational, though we can find some reasoning for it. The purging act serves as a ritual act as well, playful at times, which taps into our age-old psyche and grants us some peace of mind. What is associated today with using hand sanitizing gel, or wearing a surgical mask, has been taking place centuries ago with the act of fumigation and other purging acts. We detect the playfulness in contemporary rituals and we intend to merge the experience of an art exhibition with a unique user experience giving a chance to actively engage, explore and build onto existing works as creative collaboration. The Purgatorio’s viewer will be the spect-actor, one who will activate the experience while submitting to the set logic of the purgatory, which demands their attention at viewing each level and its artworks to unlock the next level and so forth.

[ARTISTIC PRACTICE > VAPORWAVE AND MIDDLE AGES]

The Purgatorio Mountain, visually rendered by Ronnie Karfiol, is standing lonely inside the digital-landscape, taking its inspiration from the vaporwave aesthetic, reminiscent of the computer commercials of the 1980s and 1990s. Much like in medieval art, the mountain is disconnected from a realistic perspective, not actually trying to portray anything other than ideas and concepts. Taken together, the combination of these two inspirational sources represent what philosopher Žarko Paić called “the image without the world”, image artifacts that pop up in the landscape and no longer have a reference in time or space; nor do they have nature or history. They depict the haunting freedom of representation in terms of the artificiality of the virtual world.

[ARTWORKS AND THE SPECT-ACTOR TOUR]

The artworks themselves also function as images without a world. Entering the Purgatorio Mountain, we first see Léa Porré’s Royal Fate is Fluid, which follows Louis XVI's decapitated head, confronting us with the notion of Pride. On the second level, Yiming Yang’s 3D model Splice is a hybrid - a meeting between a spider and a human being, reflecting on whether the boundaries between technology and the body could trigger in us a feeling of Envy. Following this is another Cyborgian example by artist Anthr0morph, which investigates the non-human bodies in their performance on Instagram, perhaps evoking sentiments of Wrath. The fourth floor of Sloth lets us meet Yun Choi’s Where The Heart Goes, an exploration of the sense of banality in the collective faith behind common images.

Ballet Pathetique by Adam Basanta is on the fifth terrace, showing us the useless act of Greed as expressed in the orchestrated dance of simple oscillating fans. The sixth floor, that of Gluttony, is where Letta Shtohryn’s video Offshore Bakery, shows an investigative look into the financial meganetworks woven behind the romantic facade of Valletta's old town buildings. Getting to the top, we reach the seventh level of Lust, where Mor Afgin’s installation UXUI juxtaposes the life cycle of a biological bird with that of a Bird public scooter. Throughout the journey up the floors, a sound plays in the background. Taken from Yuwol June C's video-work I would lick to be someone else. The audio (created together with rapper Xéna N.C.) is separated from its visual source, evokes the vague feeling of being trapped inside an unknown quest.

At last, we arrive at the floor of Heavenly Paradise: this is where Ebstorfer World Map by Liliana Farber invites us to take a closer look at the crossing between the reality of Google Maps and that of world travelers from centuries ago. At this moment, the game changes. We perceive the Purgatorio Mountain from another perspective, as a moment of the Kantian sublime, as the image stretches on the screen beyond all previous limitations of the quest level design. After breaking the game’s grid, inciting a visceral meaning-making, the linear exhibition mode collapses, too: the viewer has to decide whether they want to get out of the maze, or go back to the Mountain and its artworks.

About Lital Bar-Noy

Lital Bar Noy is a user experience designer and a curator. She holds a B.Des from Shenkar Visual Communication and a M.A from Bezalel, Policy and Theory of the Arts. She was an exchange student in the Department of Critical Studies at the Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna, Austria. Received an academic merit award in 2018-2019. Bar Noy participated in Facebook’s international internship program and for the past two years has been working as a product designer at Microsoft.

About Ronnie Karfiol

Ronnie Karfiol is an artist. She holds a BFA in Arts from Shenkar college, Tel Aviv. She has also studied at the H.A.W. University Hamburg, Germany. Her work was shown in museums such as Petach Tikva Museum of Art & Nahum Guttman museum [IL] as well as in galleries like SPEKTRUM Berlin, Galleria R+ Poland & the Center of Contemporary Art (CCA) Tel Aviv. Her films screened at festivals, including DocAviv, Print Screen, EMAF Germany and Currents Festival, USA. She is the recipient of Margaret & Sylvan Adams Prize (2017), the Mifal HaPais Council for Arts (2018) and the Ministry of Culture Independent Artists’ grant (2019) and the Rabinovich Foundation (2020). In 2020 She was a web resident at the joint initiative between ZKM Museum and Akademie Solitude [DE]. In 2018, she was an artist-in-residence at Cripta747 [IT]. Her works are part of the collections in both the Guttman Museum [IL] and the Herzliya Museum of Contemporary Art [IL].

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Isolarii

Ebstorfer World Map (part of the series: Isolarii) Inkjet prints, dimensions variable, 2021. A series of antique maps translated, with custom software, to Google Earth visual language

The artwork Isolarii explores the imperial and subjective task of mapping spaces. Named after 1528 Bendetto Bordone’s book Isolario (The Book of Islands), in which the author describes all the islands of the known world, Farber’s artwork challenges current methodologies to define the edges of our world. The image was produced by transforming Google Earth data so it matches the visual pattern of the Ebstorfer World Map. Isolarii immerses viewers in a fantastical space, where lines between reality and fiction are blurred. An imagined world, a world in between, that incites the reflection: what does it mean to have global technological systems that define geography? And which, if any, institution should have authority over these tasks? Isolarii

About Liliana Farber

Liliana Farber (b. 1983, Uruguay) is a visual artist based in New York City. Using custom software and public digital platforms, she examines histories and design ramifications of protocols that inform broad perceptions of space and time. Farber is a recipient of the Lumen Prize for Art and Technology, Network Culture Award from Stuttgarter Filmwinter Festival, and Artis Grant. She has exhibited in venues such as The National Museum of Contemporary Art (Portugal), The National Museum of Fine Arts (Chile), The National Museum of Visual Arts (Uruguay), Ars Electronica Festival (Austria), Arebyte Gallery (London), WRO Media Art Biennale (Poland), and Raw Art Gallery (Tel Aviv). Farber holds an MFA from Parsons School of Design (New York), Postgraduate Fine Art Studies from Hamidrasha School of Art (Israel), and a B.A from O.R.T University (Uruguay).

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